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Radioimmunotherapy for Prostate Cancer-Current Status and Future Possibilities.

Author:
  • Susan Evans Axelsson
  • Oskar Vilhelmsson Timmermand
  • Anders Bjartell
  • Sven-Erik Strand
  • Jörgen Elgqvist
Publishing year: 2016
Language: English
Pages: 165-179
Publication/Series: Seminars in Nuclear Medicine
Volume: 46
Issue: 2
Document type: Journal article review
Publisher: Elsevier

Abstract english

Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers in men and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. In the United States, it is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer after skin cancer, and in Europe it is number one. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 221,000 men in the United States would be diagnosed with PCa during 2015, and approximately 28,000 would die of the disease. According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, approximately 345,000 men were diagnosed with PCa in Europe during 2012, and despite more emphasis placed on early detection through routine screening, 72,000 men died of the disease. Hence, the need for improved therapy modalities is of utmost importance. And targeted therapies based on radiolabeled specific antibodies or peptides are a very interesting and promising alternative to increase the therapeutic efficacy and overall chance of survival of these patients. There are currently several preclinical and some clinical studies that have been conducted, or are ongoing, to investigate the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against PCa. One thing that is lacking in a lot of these published studies is the dosimetry data, which are needed to compare results between the studies and the study locations. Given the complicated tumor microenvironment and overall complexity of RIT to PCa, old and new targets and targeting strategies like combination RIT and pretargeting RIT are being improved and assessed along with various therapeutic radionuclides candidates. Given alone or in combination with other therapies, these new and improved strategies and RIT tools further enhance the clinical response to RIT drugs in PCa, making RIT for PCa an increasingly practical clinical tool.

Keywords

  • Urology and Nephrology
  • Cancer and Oncology

Other

Published
  • Urological cancer, Malmö
  • ISSN: 0001-2998
Sven-Erik Strand
E-mail: sven-erik.strand [at] med.lu.se

Project manager

Systemic Radiation Therapy Group

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Professor emeritus

Medical Radiation Physics, Lund

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