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A comparison of the Nottingham Health Profile and Short Form 36 Health Survey in patients with chronic lower limb ischaemia in a longitudinal perspective

Author:
  • Christine Wann-Hansson
  • Ingalill Rahm Hallberg
  • Bo Risberg
  • Rosemarie Klefsgård
Publishing year: 2004
Language: English
Publication/Series: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Volume: 2
Document type: Journal article
Publisher: BioMed Central

Abstract english

BACKGROUND: Different generic quality of life instruments such as the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) have revealed conflicting results in patients with chronic lower limb ischaemia in psychometric attributes in short-term evaluations. The aim of this study was to compare the NHP and the SF-36 regarding internal consistency reliability, validity, responsiveness and suitability as outcome measures in patients with lower limb ischaemia in a longitudinal perspective. METHODS: 48 patients with intermittent claudication and 42 with critical ischaemia were included. Assessment was made before and one year after revascularization using comparable domains of the NHP and the SF-36 questionnaires. RESULTS: The SF-36 was less skewed and more homogeneous than the NHP. There was an average convergent validity in three of the five comparable domains one year postoperatively. The SF-36 showed a higher internal consistency except for social functioning one-year postoperatively and was more responsive in detecting changes over time in patients with intermittent claudication. The NHP was more sensitive in discriminating among levels of ischaemia regarding pain and more able to detect changes in the critical ischaemia group. CONCLUSION: Both SF-36 and NHP have acceptable degrees of reliability for group-level comparisons, convergent and construct validity one year postoperatively. Nevertheless, the SF-36 has superior psychometric properties and was more suitable in patients with intermittent claudication. The NHP however, discriminated better among severity of ischaemia and was more responsive in patients with critical ischaemia.

Keywords

  • Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy

Other

Published
  • Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science
  • ISSN: 1477-7525
Ingalill Rahm Hallberg
E-mail: ingalill.rahm_hallberg [at] med.lu.se

Professor emerita

Older people's health and Person-Centred care

HSC

65